Rare milestone for laid back local lads

Glenn Barclay and Jordan Boyes must surely have created history last Saturday as they stood in the centre circle, shook hands, and tossed a coin to get the reserves game between Crib Point and Somerville underway. Two blokes that have played and coached against each other on countless occasions over the years, sharing the magnificent... View Article

Glenn Barclay and Jordan Boyes must surely have created history last Saturday as they stood in the centre circle, shook hands, and tossed a coin to get the reserves game between Crib Point and Somerville underway.

Two blokes that have played and coached against each other on countless occasions over the years, sharing the magnificent milestone of 300 games on the same patch of turf in the same game of footy.

When you sit back and think about it it’s quite remarkable really.

Boyes from Somerville smiled first, but Barclay and his Magpies had the last laugh.

“Yeah, Jordo won the toss and off he went, but we won by two points in a pretty scrappy game of football,” was the laid-back Barclay’s honest appraisal of the 3.15.33 to 4.7.31 victory.

“The club put a few photos up on the scoreboard, but apart from that, it was just another Saturday night. We had a band on, had a few beers and paid for it the next day – a pretty stock standard weekend for me.”

Barclay may have a relaxed demeanour but there’s no questioning his dedication to his football, becoming just the fifth player to play 300 games at the club.

The 40-year-old Crib Point local started playing footy at the age of seven in 1985 and has had football in his blood ever since.

He played about 80 games in the seniors, missing the 2001 grand final with a knee injury, before dropping to the reserves after losing a kidney after accidental contact with former teammate Mat Sloper.

He coached the reserves for five years and played most of his career as a forward or on the wing before recently settling at fullback.

“I only do it because no-one else wants to,” was his blunt explanation for the move to defence.

So what has kept him so engaged in football?

“It’s close to home, the beer’s cold and the footy trips are fantastic,” he said, with only a hint of sarcasm in his voice.

“But seriously, I just love the place. I’ve made some really close friends at the club and I just love being around the place.”

You get the feeling that Boyes loves Somerville just as much.

Another born-and-bred local who has been playing football for nearly as long as he could ride a bike.

“I grew up in Somerville and I’ve been playing footy at the club since I was five and a half, so I’ve made a lot of mates along the way, “ he said.

“That’s the best thing about being part of a footy club, the friendships and good times you have you just can’t get anywhere else.”

The 37-year-old, who retired after Saturday’s game, becomes just the third Eagle to reach the milestone. His career highlights include two reserves premierships – one as coach in 2010 and another as a playing assistant in 2014 – and making it to three other grand finals.

He has been lucky with injury missing just five games with a broken cheekbone along the journey.

“Sometimes you don’t appreciate it but looking back now I’ve loved every minute of being involved at the Somerville Football Club,” he said.

“But now it’s time to turn off the phone and play Superules for the Peninsula Raiders. It was great to share it with Barks but it’s the right time to move on.”

Well done Glenn and Jordan from everyone in the local football community.